Be the Coach, Not the Boss


In previous posts, I wrote about how your advice habit is making everyone around you feel less empowered and less smart. Michael Bungay Stanier is the author of The Advice Trap: Be Humble, Stay Curious & Change the Way You Lead Forever, a book about how to get rid of your tendency to jump in … Continue reading Be the Coach, Not the Boss

Take My Advice. On the Other Hand, Please Don’t.


You can tell whether a man is clever by his answers. you can tell whether a man is wise by his questions. -Naguib Mahfouz Michael Bungay Stanier says you have an advice problem.  I have one, too.  Bungay Stanier is the author of The Advice Trap: Be Humble, Stay Curious & Change the Way You … Continue reading Take My Advice. On the Other Hand, Please Don’t.

Your Next Career Move is in the Cards


January is pitch month – the month most writers receive all kinds of ideas for posts or articles from a wide variety of sources.  This one was nearly irresistible: Subject: Candace, want to review a Psychic Coach (who’s also a Professor & hit Songwriter)? You bet I do. Toronto, Canada-based Ralph Hammelman is the founder … Continue reading Your Next Career Move is in the Cards

Coach in Quiet Moments


In my experience, it’s rare to find people who are willing to risk being that open with each other. “Feedback” is a euphemism for many things, but almost never for anything positive. If you have something good to say, you never preface it with, “Do you mind if I give you some feedback?”

Boundaries and Standards


In the chapter entitled “Increase your Natural Power,” her advice includes how to set boundaries for yourself. “Boundaries, “ she writes,” are simply the things that people can’t do to you, lines that will protect you and allow you to be your best.” We all need them, but it can be hard to set them and stick to them, especially if you like to think of yourself as a nice person.

Coaching Yourself: Problem Solving


We all spend an enormous amount of energy trying to figure out what’s coming next – trying to know what the outcome of a situation will be. It’s the impulse to read the last chapter of a novel when the suspense gets to be too much. Once you know how it ends, you can relax and enjoy the story. And possibly pick up on more clues along the way, noticing details you might have missed if you didn’t know the identity of the killer.