How to Ask for a Raise


Asking for a raise can be a daunting task, which is why many hesitate to ask for what they think they deserve, especially if they are new to the workforce. However, a recent study found that 70% of people who ask for a raise get one. So while asking for a raise can be a stressful experience, take comfort in knowing the odds are in your favor.

Love and Money in the Interview


“What salary are you looking for?” Everyone hates the question. Everyone. Talking about salary is awkward for most jobseekers, and for good reason. If you mention a figure that’s too low, you leave money on the table if you get the offer – and that’s the best case scenario.

Negotiating Salary


I had a client who had a great interview out of state. So great, in fact, that the recruiter called him before he left the city to offer him the job. When the final offer letter came, the salary was just below the ‘low $40,000 range’ mentioned in the interview. He liked the job; liked the company, but didn’t know how to open the negotiation without losing the offer.”

Money, Freedom and Time


Mark McGuinness, a creative entrepreneur, says that a creative person needs three things to be happy:

Freedom – to do what you want, when you want and how you want it. Not just in
holidays and spare time – but also doing meaningful work, in your own way.
Money – to maintain your independence and fund your creative projects. Of course you want a nice place to live, but you’re not so worried about a bigger car than the guy next door. You’d rather spend money on experiences than status symbols.
Time – to spend as you please, exploring the world and allowing your mind to wander in search of new ideas.

Prepare for a Phone Interview


The credit for this post goes to Susan Heathfield, a Human Resources expert who has been covering HR for about.com since 2000. In her HR newsletter, Vol. 11 No. 81, dated July, 2010, she writes an excellent article for recruiters about how to construct questions for an effective telephone screening interview. Viewed in reverse, you can use her questions as a way to prepare for a phone screening – or any in-person interview.